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Unit Investment Trusts, or UITs, are investment vehicles whereby investors purchase units of the trusts. Unlike actively managed open-end funds (mutual funds) UITs are a relatively fixed basket of securities that are professionally monitored and have a set termination date. Through one purchase, investors have the opportunity to own a variety of securities in one portfolio that may help them meet their investment objectives. UITs offer investors the potential for defined income, daily liquidity and a disciplined investment approach for a wide range of investment objectives and risk tolerances. Additionally, UITs can assist investors in establishing a long-term asset allocation strategy because they are generally diversified and transparent in nature. As with any investment, investing in a UIT or open-ended mutual fund involves risks. It is important to understand the risks involved in each investment but also the main differences between UITs and mutual funds including differences in costs, expenses, structures and taxes.

Learn more about UITs selected by Cohen & Steers >  

 

Please see important disclosures and risks below.

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This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and should not be relied upon as investment advice, does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell a security or other investment and is not intended to predict or depict performance of any investment.  This material is not being provided in a fiduciary capacity and is not intended to recommend any investment policy or investment strategy or take into account the specific objectives or circumstances of any investor.  Please consult with your investment, tax or legal adviser regarding your individual circumstances prior to investing. 

Data quoted represents past performance, which is no guarantee of future results. The information presented does not reflect the performance of any fund or account managed or serviced by Cohen & Steers, and there is no guarantee that investors will experience the type of performance reflected.

Please consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses of any Cohen & Steers U.S. registered open-end fund carefully before investing. A summary prospectus or prospectus containing this and other information may be obtained by visiting cohenandsteers.com or by calling 800.330.7348. Please read the summary prospectus or prospectus carefully before investing.

Risks of Investing in Closed-End Funds
Shares of many closed-end funds frequently trade at a discount from their net asset value. The funds are subject to stock market risk, which is the risk that stock prices overall will decline over short or long periods, adversely affecting the value of an investment in a fund. 

Investors should consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expense of the fund carefully before investing. You can obtain the fund’s most recent periodic reports, when available, and other regulatory filings by contacting your financial advisor or visiting cohenandsteers.com. These reports and other filings can be found on the Securities and Exchange Commission’s EDGAR Database. You should read these reports and other filings carefully before investing.

Leverage Risk
The use of leverage by closed-end funds is speculative and there are special risks and costs associated with leverage. The use of leverage increases the volatility of a fund's net asset value in both up and down markets. A closed-end fund may seek to enhance its dividend yield through leverage but there is no guarantee that a leverage strategy will be successful.

Risks of Investing in MLP Securities. An investment in MLPs involves risks that differ from a similar investment in equity securities, such as common stock, of a corporation. Holders of equity securities issued by MLPs have the rights typically afforded to limited partners in a limited partnership. As compared to common shareholders of a corporation, holders of such equity securities have more limited control and limited rights to vote on matters affecting the partnership. There are certain tax risks associated with an investment in equity MLP units. Additionally, conflicts of interest may exist among common unit holders, subordinated unit holders and the general partner or managing member of an MLP; for example a conflict may arise as a result of incentive distribution payments. MLPs are subject to significant regulation and may be adversely affected by changes in the regulatory environment, including the risk that an MLP could lose its tax status as a partnership. MLPs may trade less frequently than larger companies due to their smaller capitalizations, which may result in erratic price movement or difficulty in buying or selling. MLPs may have additional expenses, as some MLPs pay incentive distribution fees to their general partners. The value of MLPs depends largely on the MLPs being treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes. If MLPs were subject to U.S. federal income taxation, distributions generally would be taxed as dividend income. As a result, after-tax returns could be reduced, which could cause a decline in the value of MLPs. If MLPs are unable to maintain partnership status because of tax law changes, the MLPs would be taxed as corporations and there could be a decrease in the value of the MLP securities.

Risks of Investing in Preferred Securities. Investing in any market exposes investors to risks. In general, the risks of investing in preferred securities are similar to those of investing in bonds, including credit risk and interest-rate risk. As nearly all preferred securities have issuer call options, call risk and reinvestment risk are also important considerations. In addition, investors face equity-like risks, such as deferral or omission of distributions, subordination to bonds and other more senior debt, and higher corporate governance risks with limited voting rights. Risks associated with preferred securities differ from risks inherent with other investments. In particular, in the event of bankruptcy, a company’s preferred securities are senior to common stock but subordinated to all other types of corporate debt. Throughout this commentary we will make comparisons of preferred securities to corporate bonds, municipal bonds and Treasury securities. It is important to note that corporate bonds sit higher in the capital structure than preferred securities and therefore, in the event of bankruptcy, will be senior to the preferred securities. Municipal bonds are issued and backed by state and local governments and their agencies, and the interest from municipal securities is often free from both state and local income taxes. Treasury securities are issued by the U.S. government and are generally considered the safest of all bonds since they are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government as to timely payment of principal and interest. Preferred funds may invest in below-investment-grade securities and unrated securities judged to be below investment grade by the Advisor. Below investment-grade securities or equivalent unrated securities generally involve greater volatility of price and risk of loss of income and principal, and may be more susceptible to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions than higher grade securities. The benchmarks do not contain below-investment-grade securities.

Duration Risk. Duration is a mathematical calculation of the average life of a fixed-income or preferred security that serves as a measure of the security’s price risk to changes in interest rates (or yields). Securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to interest rate (or yield) changes than securities with shorter durations. Duration differs from maturity in that it considers potential changes to interest rates, and a security’s coupon payments, yield, price and par value and call features, in addition to the amount of time until the security matures. Various techniques may be used to shorten or lengthen the Fund’s duration. The duration of a security will be expected to change over time with changes in market factors and time to maturity

Risks of Investing in Real Assets Securities 
A real assets strategy is subject to the risk that its asset allocations may not achieve the desired risk-return characteristic, underperform other similar investment strategies or cause an investor to lose money. The strategy is subject to the risks associated with investments in real estate securities, commodities and natural resource equities, among other investments. The risks of investing in REITs are similar to those associated with direct investments in real estate securities. Property values may fall due to increasing vacancies, declining rents resulting from economic, legal, tax, political or technological developments, lack of liquidity, limited diversification and sensitivity to certain economic factors such as interest rate changes and market recessions An investment in commodity-linked derivative instruments may be subject to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities, particularly if the instruments involve leverage. The value of commodity-linked derivative instruments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates, or factors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs and international economic, political and regulatory developments. The use of derivatives presents risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in traditional securities. Among the risks presented are market risk, credit risk, counterparty risk, leverage risk and liquidity risk. The use of derivatives can lead to losses because of adverse movements in the price or value of the underlying asset, index or rate, which may be magnified by certain features of the derivatives. The market value of securities of natural resource companies may be affected by numerous factors, including events occurring in nature, inflationary pressures and international politics. Because the strategy invests significantly in natural resource companies, there is the risk that the strategy will perform poorly during a downturn in the natural resource sector. Please read the Fund’s prospectus for additional information.

Futures Trading Is Volatile, Highly Leveraged and May Be Illiquid. This is not an inducement to buy or sell commodity interests. Investments in commodity futures contracts and options on commodity futures contracts have a high degree of price variability and are subject to rapid and substantial price changes. Such investments could incur significant losses. There can be no assurance that the options strategy will be successful. The use of options on commodity futures contracts is to enhance risk-adjusted total returns. The use of options, however, may not provide any, or only partial, protection for market declines. The return performance of the commodity futures contracts may not parallel the performance of the commodities or indexes that serve as the basis for the options it buys or sells; this basis risk may reduce overall returns.

Cohen & Steers Capital Management, Inc. (Cohen & Steers) is a registered investment advisory firm that provides investment management services to corporate retirement, public and union retirement plans, endowments, foundations and mutual funds.

Cohen & Steers U.S. registered open-end funds are distributed by Cohen & Steers Securities, LLC. Cohen & Steers U.S. registered open-end funds are only available to U.S. residents.

Cohen & Steers UK Limited is authorized and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FRN 458459).

Cohen & Steers Japan, LLC, is a registered financial instruments operator (investment advisory and agency business with the Financial Services Agency of Japan and the Kanto Local Finance Bureau No. 2857) and is a member of the Japan Investment Advisers Association.

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Cohen & Steers is a global investment manager specializing in liquid real assets, including real estate securities, listed infrastructure, commodities and natural resource equities, as well as preferred securities and other income solutions.

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